Should I Get The Peg Perego Primo Viaggio Convertible For My Child?

Peg Perego Primo Viaggio Convertible Baby and Toddler Car Seat Rear and Forward Facing

The Peg Perego Primo Viaggio Convertible Car Seat is a top-quality car seat designed by a leading brand with a heavy focus on safety. This high-end offering provides the latest technology in an attractive, comfortable car seat.

Made in Italy, the Peg Perego Primo Viaggio convertible car seat sports leading safety features like a contoured steel back plate that minimizes flexing and provides extra stability without sacrificing comfort.

High Quality European Design Emphasizing Safety

You tend to hear the same names over and over again when shopping for and researching baby gear. A name that you don’t hear as often as the others is Peg Perego, even though it has been on the market for quite some time. How does it rank when compared to the other big companies out there? Should you consider it for your baby?

Manufactured in Italy, the great thing about this brand is their products are all designed and developed in one place. As a company, Peg Perego believes very strongly in this. Nothing is outsourced and no other company has a hand in the design or creation of the baby seats.

The Primo Viaggio Convertible is built on a strong concept of safety. There are many different elements that go into making this a very competent and secure device for your child, including:

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No Children Died in Traffic Accidents in Norway in 2019


No children died in traffic accidents last year in Norway and buckling all children in rear facing car seats until four years of age was a big reason why.

Read more about how they keep their children so safe in the car.

Norway has a lot to be proud of as 2019 marked the first year of zero recorded deaths by traffic accidents for children under the age of 10. This is the continuation of a positive trend that has been occuring there for the last 30 years.

In the USA motor vehicle deaths are sadly still a leading cause of death among children. Many of these deaths can be prevented as nearly 35% of children who die in motor vehicle crashes are not even buckled up. In addition over 115,000 children are injured each year in car accidents.

Norway can teach us a lot about keeping our children safe in the car. The Norwegian country has lower speed limits on its road than you would see in America. They also have aggressively removed on street parking to make roads safer and create more room for pedestrians and bicyclists.

The most important thing that Norway has done to improve child safety in vehicles is require that all children are buckled in a rear facing car seat until the age of four. Keeping a child buckled in a rear facing car seat until age four is the law in Norway and the country has worked hard to educate parents on the importance of rear facing car seats.

This extended rear facing provides parents a safer alternative than forward facing car seats. Children in rear facing car seats absorb impact across the entire back of the seat during a car accident, compared to front facing seats where only the harness is holding them in place. With some American parents still turning children around as young as 1 year old and as small as 20lbs it is important to look at what Norway has accomplished eliminating child vehicle deaths.

Current guidance from the AAP recommends parents keep children rear facing as long as possible, until they reach the height or weight allowed by the car seat manufacturer. Most every currently available child restraint system has weight limits for rear facing use that can accommodate children up to 35 or 40 lbs. All the seats on our top rated car seats list can secure children up to age 4. The car seats aren’t the problem, it is how parents use them.


Many parents acquiesce to nagging children who want to sit forward facing. Kids will often want to sit forward facing because it is more comfortable for them or because it makes them feel older and more like their big siblings riding beside them. Parents need to understand that moving a child to a forward facing car seat before the age of four increases the risk of injury in a motor vehicle accident.

Norway has a lot to be proud of by cutting child motor vehicle deaths to zero. America should learn valuable lessons from our Norwegian friends and work to better educate parents about the benefits of extended rear facing car seats. Kids might cry or complain as you buckle them into their rear facing car seat but parents can drive down the road knowing that they have made the safest choice possible for their child.

Is the Maxi Cosi Pria 85 Max convertible car seat a good investment for your family? Find out in our 2020 review.

Maxi-Cosi Pria 85 Max Convertible Car Seat, Night Black

The Maxi Cosi Pria 85 Max is a 2-mode convertible car seat designed to last from newborn to booster age. In rear-facing, it holds infants 5 – 40 pounds and 22 – 85 pounds in forward-facing harness mode. Unlike all-in-one convertibles, there is no booster mode.

The Pria 85 Max is one of a few different versions of the Pria line that Maxi-Cosi has offered through the years. It’s easy to get this one confused with the “non-Max” version, the Maxi-Cosi Pria 85, but that seat has a minimum weight of 14 pounds, so it is NOT for newborns. The Max has higher quality fabric that is more breathable, plus it has a magnetic ClipQuick chest buckle.

While the regular version would be a good upgrade from an infant car seat, the Max will serve you from the time you take your baby home until they’re ready for a booster seat. Let’s have a look at some of the features that make the Max stand out from the rest.

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Is the Diono Radian 3RXT All-in-One car seat a good investment for your family? Read our 2020 review to find out.

Diono Radian 3RXT All-in-One Convertible Car Seat, Black

The Diono Radian 3RXT has been updated from previous models. It’s showing some promise as a good all-in-one seat. A few things have changed from the older RXT model, including installation and aesthetic features.

Most convertible car seats on the market are good, but not usually great in all areas. They can be bulky, uncomfortable, or too big to provide a snug fit for a newborn. The 3RXT comes really close to hitting all the marks, though it’s got some room for improvement, especially for newborn and booster fit.

Let’s dive in so you can decide if this convertible seat is worth the investment for your family.

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The Most Comprehensive Review of the Clek Fllo Convertible Car Seat

Clek Fllo Convertible Baby and Toddler Car Seat Rear and Forward Facing with Anti Rebound Bar, Noire

The Clek Fllo 3-Across Convertible Car Seat is designed to accommodate. For parents, it delivers convenience and the latest safety technology. For young ones, its built-in performance features ensure a smooth, comfortable and safe ride.

At 16.9 inches wide, the Clek Fllo convertible car seat is narrow and compact. So, if you need to fit three car seats across the back seat of your vehicle, this is the model for you.

One of the Safest Narrow Convertible Car Seats on the Market

In the Clek Fllo, you’ll find industry-leading safety features, putting it among the safest narrow car seats. These features are designed to limit motion of the car seat in the event of an accident. Minimizing motion reduces the potential your child is injured in a crash.

Some of these noteworthy features are:

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Is the Graco Extend2Fit convertible car seat the answer to keep your child rear-facing longer? Find out in our 2019 review

Graco Extend2Fit Convertible Car Seat, Gotham, One Size

Extended rear-facing (ERF) in car seats has been a huge topic in the car seat realm ever since the American Academy of Pediatrics recommended rear-facing for a minimum of 2 years. The NHTSA (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration) recommends rear-facing for as long as possible. A British study found that a minimum of 4 years is even better.

Since most infant seats cap out at 25-30 pounds, it would be a good investment to buy or upgrade to a convertible car seat with a higher rear-facing limit. Whether you start out with a convertible or infant seat is up to you, though many child safety experts recommend using a dedicated infant seat for your baby’s first year.

The Graco Extend2Fit convertible has one of the highest rear-facing limits we’ve seen at 50 pounds. Since the average 4 year old weighs about 40 pounds, this seat could allow a vast number of children to ride rear-facing well past their 2nd birthday.

But what about their legs? Won’t they be cramped? This is the #1 concern with ERF. Many studies have shown that it’s actually more dangerous riding forward-facing, particularly because children’s heads, necks and spines are much more susceptible to injury than their legs. Plus, kids are a lot more flexible than adults, and a broken leg is less life-threatening than a neck or head injury.

However, the Graco Extend2Fit convertible car seat has taken the issue of cramped legs into account with this innovative model. We’ve broken down the stats for you so you can decide if this seat is worth the hype.

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